Birch syrup is a savory mineral tasting syrup made from the sap of birch trees, and produced in much the same way as maple syrup. It is seldom used for pancake or waffle syrup, more often it is used as an ingredient paired with pork or salmon dishes in sauces, glazes, and dressings, and as a flavoring in ice cream, beer, wine, and soft drinks. It is condensed from the sap, which has about 0.5-2% percent sugar content, depending on the species of birch, location, weather, and season. The finished syrup is 66% sugar or more to be classified as a syrup. Birch sap sugar is about 42–54% fructose and 45% glucose, with a small amount of sucrose and trace amounts of galactose. The flavor of birch syrup has a distinctive and mineral-rich caramel-like taste that is not unlike molasses or balsamic condiment or some types of soy, with a hint of spiciness. Different types of birch will produce slightly different flavour profiles; some more copper, others with hints of wildflower honey. Many people remark that while Birch syrup has the same sugar content of maple it is far more savory than sweet.

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